Last edited by Akinor
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

6 edition of Pursuing privacy in Cold War America found in the catalog.

Pursuing privacy in Cold War America

by Deborah Nelson

  • 372 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Columbia University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism.,
    • Privacy in literature.,
    • Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 20th century.,
    • Privacy, Right of -- United States -- History -- 20th century.,
    • Privacy -- United States -- History -- 20th century.,
    • Autobiography in literature.,
    • Confession in literature.,
    • Cold War in literature.,
    • Self in literature.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-200) and index.

      StatementDeborah Nelson.
      SeriesGender and culture
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPS310.P75 N45 2002
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxii, 209 p. ;
      Number of Pages209
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3948324M
      ISBN 100231111207, 0231111215
      LC Control Number2001037260

      "An important addition to the literature on U.S. policy toward Latin America and the general literature on U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War."--William LeoGrande, author of Our Own Backyard: The United States in Central America, "A wonderful and refreshingly clear-eyed book."--Howard J. Wiarda, author of The Soul of Latin AmericaPrice: $   By Patrick O'Donnell. Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Press. xi, pp. Cloth, $; paper, $Author: Shelly Eversley.

        The sad truth is that 30 years after the supposed end of the Cold War, the U.S. military-industrial complex has failed to reimagine itself in anything but Cold War terms, and its “New” Cold War is just a revival of the old Cold War that it spent the last .   Pursuing such a realist foreign policy would likely mean an end to reflexive U.S. support of movements aimed at undermining dictatorial governments, though Walt’s book .

      The end of the Cold War is as good a point as any to move onto your final book, Confronting the Bomb. This is an abbreviated version of Lawrence Wittner’s major work of scholarship in three volumes, Struggle Against the Bomb, from the s to the present day.   Is the US Pursuing a Rogue Policy by Waging Undeclared War Against Russia? Washington’s NATO buildup on Russia’s borders, its refusal to cooperate with Moscow in Syria and Ukraine, and its.


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Pursuing privacy in Cold War America by Deborah Nelson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War by:   "The cold war containment metaphor was not simply an expression of foreign policy, or domestic ideology, but a figure for the impossible incoherence of masculine autonomy.

The power and mobility of the this metaphor of containment were equal only to the power and elasticity of the metaphor of intrusion -- the enemy within -- which conveyed the /5. Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War ideology.

Is privacy dead. By all recent accounts, we should think so. When independent counsel Kenneth Starr published on the Internet in the titillating details of President Clinton's relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky, there was widespread agreement that the “Starr Report” marked the death of privacy.

Pursuing privacy in Cold War America. [Deborah Nelson] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for This book explores the panic over the 'death of privacy' Read more Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects: American poetry -- 20th century -- History and. Electronic books Criticism, interpretation, etc History: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Nelson, Deborah, Pursuing privacy in Cold War America. New York: Columbia University Press, © (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors.

One. Reinventing Privacy was published in Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America on page 1. She explores the panic over the "death of privacy" aroused by broad changes in postwar culture: the growth of suburbia, the advent of television, the popularity of psychoanalysis, the arrival of computer databases, and the spectacles of confession associated with ing this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense Author: Deborah Nelson.

Introduction:The Death of Privacy was published in Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America on page xi. Nelson argues that the desire to stabilize privacy in a constitutional right and the movement toward confession in postwar American poetry were not simply manifestations of the anxiety about privacy.

Supreme Court justices and confessional poets such as Anne Sexton, Robert Lowell, W. Snodgrass, and Sylvia Plath were redefining the nature of. Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War : Columbia University Press.

Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War ideology.

She explores the panic over the "death of privacy" aroused by broad changes in postwar culture: the growth of suburbia, the advent of television, the popularity of psychoanalysis, the arrival of computer databases, and the spectacles of confession associated with ing this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense.

Lyndon Johnson invaded the Dominican Republic. Richard Nixon sponsored a coup attempt in Chile. Ronald Reagan waged covert warfare in Nicaragua. Nearly a dozen times during the Cold War, American presidents turned their attention from standoffs with the Soviet Union to intervene in Latin American affairs.

In each instance, it was declared that the security of the United States was at stake 5/5(1). Pairing landmark Supreme Court decisions on the right to privacy with the investigation of privacy and private life in the work of the confessional poets, the book takes up these two discourses for their particularly subtle investigation of the language of privacy as the concept evolved over the next decades.

pursuing privacy in cold war america Gender and Culture Carolyn G. Heilbrun and Nancy K. Miller, editors Gender and Culture a series of columbia university press Edited by Carolyn G.

Heilbrun and Nancy K. Miller In Dora’s Case: Freud, Hysteria, Feminism Edited by Charles Bernheimer and Claire Kahane Breaking the Chain: Women, Theory, and French Realist Fiction Naomi Schor Between Men. Book Reviews ties radically alters the rhetorical and practical terms of the privacy debate.

In her discussion of Roe v. Wade, for example, Nelson shows the ways in which â â [w]omen, especially mothers in cold war culture, often functioned as metaphors of a highly unstable border between public and private, a possibly treacherous incapacity to defend the boundaries of home and.

This pursuing privacy in cold war america will provide the powerful basic book to " and through the ated of rewarding events, for which book is based, provide some strategic results as nicely. This administrator is an analysis to tropical links and is infected for factorizations who find to return the contemporary administrator of roots.

Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America (Gender and Culture) Deborah Nelson Click here if your download doesn"t start automatically. The Cold War was fought and won pretty much exclusively on military and cultural terms.

The economic side was relevant only because the Soviets' doomed model inhibited any real competition. A synthetic account of how science became a central weapon in the ideological Cold ble Mention for the Forum for the History of Science in America Book Prize of the Forum for the History of Science in AmericaFor most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except.

This nuclear assistance was part of a Cold War strategy known as “Atoms for Peace.” The strategy’s name comes from Dwight Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” speech, given before the.There are more than 1 million books from around the world in our library archive, please visit now and enjoy.

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